The Monopoly Monkey

[Crowd laughs, I place the microphone back on the stand and make a self-deprecating little wave to the audience].

Yesterday, it was confirmed that Intuit — a company specialising in financial software, that, in unrelated news, I first heard of 24-hours ago— was in the process of completing a $12bn deal to buy Mailchimp, the newsletter service that is best known (to me at least) for…


The titular ‘doughnut’

It’s possible that some people will have listened to and been surprised (or even disappointed) by how little of the first 6 episodes were dedicated to examining and scrutinising the workings of GCHQ. Well, this final episode — which brings the story to its modern denouement — goes inside the famous Cheltenham landmark and dives into the story of how, in 2013, Edward Snowden blew the lid on its operations.

Making this podcast has been an exercise in trying to balance my natural inclination towards scepticism about the work of the security services…


A helpful checklist.

Before I start, I would like to preface everything I’m going to write by saying: please consider, at the earliest possible point, working with a production company or hiring a producer/editor. My company, Podot, and I are available for all of these services, and at the very least can offer bespoke consultancy. Alright, that’s the stuff to get my accountant off my back, now here are the goodies…

It’s 2021. We live in a world that has never been more connected and never been more fractured. We have just spent the last 18 months locked away in our homes, working…


Three books that will prepare you for life in the modern workplace

I am a member of a book group that meets once every two months. The group takes a pretty diverse view of the world of literature and has read figures ranging from Toni Morrison to Henry James, via Carson McCullers and JG Ballard. The one rule is that the books should be in some way considered ‘classic’ — they shouldn’t be throwaway books that you read for pleasure; there has to be an element of .

Anyhow, meandering intro aside, last month I found myself reading Kōbō Abe’s This is not really a novel that…


Voice commands wouldn’t shock someone from the 1960s — so what technologies are we failing to imagine in 2021?

Pete Campbell, inventing Alexa

Earlier this week, I asked Alexa — the Amazon-designed voice-activated assistant, which is accessible via a worrying number of Echo devices in my house — to turn the radio on. I do this several times a day, but I’ve been watching recently, and part of my brain has been left in the 1960s. And I found myself thinking: it would seem crazy to Don Draper or Pete Campbell if they found themselves dropped in 2021, that we could turn the radio on at just the drop of a word.

But the more I thought about it, the less…


The graveyard in Prestbury

When I first conceived of , I thought that it would be a true-crime adjacent series looking at the mirroring cases of Geoffrey Prime and Gareth Williams.

I hadn’t heard of Prime until 2020, whereas the Williams case had always been rather closer to me. He died in 2010 on Alderney Street in Pimlico, which was just round the corner from where I had just moved with my mother. And I mean round the corner: one right turn and one left turn, about 3 minutes of walking.

It was a sensational story and obviously…


Yesterday, one of those minor Twitter controversies broke out, centring around the fact that the podcast had carried an advert for the US Military. for those who are not ‘in the know’ is one Earth’s biggest podcasts: a sort-of tech/digital culture documentary jamboree. It came in for its own controversy earlier this summer, centring on an expose of Bon Appetit, but that’s another story…

I presume that there had been flack from listeners, thought the first I (or a lot of the people replying on Twitter) heard of it was when the official


Me and you, participating in a corporate team.

I don’t believe in myself.

With most of the things I’ve attempted in life, I haven’t obviously failed. I’ve passed my exams, my degree, my driving test. I’ve held down jobs and completed projects; cast votes in local elections and kept a tidy house. My dog is flourishing, I feed and water and walk him everyday and I believe that he’s happy. (We will exhibit him at a dog show next weekend and if he doesn’t win a rosette it…


I took the name of this episode from the book written by Rhona Prime (wife of Geoffrey) shortly after his sentencing. I had always intended the Prime affair to arc across the series, in this case two episode — , about his arrest, and about his trial — separated, as a sort-of creative intermission, by last week’s special puzzle episode, .

Rhona Prime’s account of her husband’s capture and trial is harrowing in its single-minded defence of a man who had brought their lives crashing down around them. It’s a…


So, a disclaimer to start off with: I have repeatedly over the last year referred to this as a unique piece of podcasting. I’m actually quite confident that it’s *not* unique. But I don’t think it’s ever been done before in this manner or with this panache, so I’ll keep saying ‘unique’. Sue me.

Last summer I decided I wanted to make a podcast documentary about a large ornamental clock that hangs in a shopping centre in Cheltenham. If this doesn’t sound like a good or interesting idea, then let me expand slightly on the clock’s history and why I…

Nick Hilton

Writer. Podcast entrepreneur. London. Interested in politics and the media. Co-founder podotpods.com Email: nick@podotpods.com.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store